Ruta GinTonic

The Perfect is a new occasional series featuring advice from experts on how to prepare your favorite food and drinks.  If you have an idea for an upcoming topic, let us know. Don't be fooled: the gin and tonic may be many things, but easy it is not. “It’s a very simple drink, as is the martini,” says London mixologist Jamie Walker, the global brand ambassador for Bombay Sapphire gin. “For that reason, it’s very easy to get wrong.” Because there’s so little that goes into this iconic drink — gin, tonic water, ice and perhaps a bit of lime — what really matters are good ingredients. For this particular cocktail, we have the British to thank, namely, Brits in 19th-century India, who were searching for ways to get their loyal subjects to ingest quinine, which is used to treat malaria and has at times been thought to repel mosquitos, which carry the disease. The amount of quinine in modern tonic water is a fraction of what’s needed for treatment (you’d need about 7 quarts of tonic water to even come close), but the drink’s popularity was established. More Entertainment stories Pitt says he learned lesson from Aniston fallout Disgraced pastor Ted Haggard to do 'Wife Swap' '16 and Pregnant' pair lose child over dirty house R.E.M. announces they're calling it quits 'Lost' actor, teen bride score reality show Yet even gin and tonic lovers face an uphill battle to find a good one.  Even when done right, it’s not an easy drink to love — tonic’s slightly bitter quinine taste is a turnoff to sweet-drink lovers. Atop the list of potential pitfalls is the tonic, a misunderstood beverage if ever there was one, and a potentially devastating blow to a perfect G&T. “The sad part is, it’s screwed up at 90 percent of the bars in America, and you know the reason?” asks Dale DeGroff, one of the nation’s leading mixology consultants and author of “The Craft of the Cocktail.” “Ninety percent of bars in America use soda out of a gun that in no way, shape or form resembles quinine water.” The better bet is tonic from a bottle — preferably one of those single-serving jobs, which preserves freshness. Request it that way if you’re ordering in a bar; the best bars will at least stock club soda and tonic in bottles. Brands are a matter of preference, though DeGroff is partial to Schweppes. (Me too, and I spent the better part of my childhood becoming a tonic water connoisseur — without gin.) Gin vs. gin The secret to the gin is the choice of botanicals. All gins have juniper as a flavor base in their distillation, which is what provides those foresty scents. But most use additional flavorings of citrus and spices. Bombay Sapphire has made its reputation on its use of 10 botanicals, from lemon peel to cubeb berries, a Javanese pepper. The mix makes Sapphire’s taste profile spicier than most — though Walker insists it’s the balance of flavors, not the number of them, that is key to its appeal. DeGroff prefers a more straightforward gin — any London dry such as Beefeater or regular Bombay — to the more aromatic options, which also include Dutch and Plymouth gins, and new options like Tanqueray Ten. John Gertsen, principal bartender at Boston’s No. 9 Park, opts for “something snappy” like the original Tanqueray. The key to the drink’s classic taste, DeGroff says, is to balance the bitterness of the tonic against the juniper and other flavors in the gin. “But always the juniper on top,” he adds. As for the rest, choose a tall, slim, chilled highball glass, the freshest limes possible and — no matter how hot the day — solid cubes of the coldest ice you can get. Ratios for tonic to gin vary widely, from equal parts to 2:1. It’s really a matter of taste. Variations abound, and none are beyond the pale: a sprig of mint, or a dash of Angostura bitters only add additional layers of flavor.  But the humble gin and tonic is a hot-weather drink, best not to be overthought. “Keep it simple,” Gertsen says. “A gentle stir and a big ol' hunk of lime and head for the hammock.”
En 1783, Johann Jacob Schweppe, joyero de origen alemán residente en la ciudad suiza de Ginebra , inventa un sistema eficaz con el que introducir burbujas de anhídrido carbónico en el agua envasada en botellas. La compañía fundada por Schweppes a la que puso su nombre se estableció en Londres, capital europea de la época, donde primero el agua con gas y luego las sodas de frutas hicieron furor. No fue hasta 1870 cuando a partir del extraordinario crecimiento que había tenido la producción de jarabes medicinales en la farmacia anglosajona, J Schweppe & Co tuvo la idea de incluir quinina en la soda carbonatada de naranja para producir agua tónica; una bebida que además de refrescante era un medicamento para combatir el Paludismo.
Para celebrar las sucesivas victorias de las tropas británicas en la India, un alto oficial británico propuso añadirle Ginebra a la tónica para fabricar un combinado alcohólico, no queda claro si se escogió la Ginebra por ser la ciudad donde residía Schweppes al inventar la Tónica o si esto se hizo debido las propiedades medicinales que desde la antigüedad se han atribuido a la Ginebra.
Existe otra versión que es aquella que asegura que el combinado de ginebra con tónica nace precisamente debido a las propiedades de la quinina para combatir la malaria. Los soldados británicos desplazados a la India comenzaron a combinar la tónica con la ginebra para poder mejorar el sabor de la primera.
De esta manera comienza el Gin tonic que rápidamente se extendió por todo el planeta.
Se considera como magnífico digestivo, pues la perfecta conjunción de amargos, dulces y anisados presentes en el combinado, acelera la digestión.
No se recomienda mezclar con zumo (jugo) de limón, pues el ácido cítrico presente en esta fruta reacciona con el Anhidrido carbónico de la Tónica dejando a esta sin sus características burbujas y haciendo que el Gin tonic pierda su fuerza en breves minutos. Por lo que se puede decorar sólo con piel de limón o de lima
A pesar de esta recomendación, el agregado de zumo (jugo) de limón es una costumbre en varios países, donde incluso se introduce una rodaja transversal de limón en la copa.


The Perfect is a new occasional series featuring advice from experts on how to prepare your favorite food and drinks. If you have an idea for an upcoming topic, let us know.
Don’t be fooled: the gin and tonic may be many things, but easy it is not.
“It’s a very simple drink, as is the martini,” says London mixologist Jamie Walker, the global brand ambassador for Bombay Sapphire gin. “For that reason, it’s very easy to get wrong.”
Because there’s so little that goes into this iconic drink — gin, tonic water, ice and perhaps a bit of lime — what really matters are good ingredients.
For this particular cocktail, we have the British to thank, namely, Brits in 19th-century India, who were searching for ways to get their loyal subjects to ingest quinine, which is used to treat malaria and has at times been thought to repel mosquitos, which carry the disease. The amount of quinine in modern tonic water is a fraction of what’s needed for treatment (you’d need about 7 quarts of tonic water to even come close), but the drink’s popularity was established.
Yet even gin and tonic lovers face an uphill battle to find a good one. Even when done right, it’s not an easy drink to love — tonic’s slightly bitter quinine taste is a turnoff to sweet-drink lovers.
Atop the list of potential pitfalls is the tonic, a misunderstood beverage if ever there was one, and a potentially devastating blow to a perfect G&T.
“The sad part is, it’s screwed up at 90 percent of the bars in America, and you know the reason?” asks Dale DeGroff, one of the nation’s leading mixology consultants and author of “The Craft of the Cocktail.” “Ninety percent of bars in America use soda out of a gun that in no way, shape or form resembles quinine water.”
The better bet is tonic from a bottle — preferably one of those single-serving jobs, which preserves freshness. Request it that way if you’re ordering in a bar; the best bars will at least stock club soda and tonic in bottles. Brands are a matter of preference, though DeGroff is partial to Schweppes. (Me too, and I spent the better part of my childhood becoming a tonic water connoisseur — without gin.)
Gin vs. gin
The secret to the gin is the choice of botanicals. All gins have juniper as a flavor base in their distillation, which is what provides those foresty scents. But most use additional flavorings of citrus and spices. Bombay Sapphire has made its reputation on its use of 10 botanicals, from lemon peel to cubeb berries, a Javanese pepper. The mix makes Sapphire’s taste profile spicier than most — though Walker insists it’s the balance of flavors, not the number of them, that is key to its appeal.
DeGroff prefers a more straightforward gin — any London dry such as Beefeater or regular Bombay — to the more aromatic options, which also include Dutch and Plymouth gins, and new options like Tanqueray Ten. John Gertsen, principal bartender at Boston’s No. 9 Park, opts for “something snappy” like the original Tanqueray.
The key to the drink’s classic taste, DeGroff says, is to balance the bitterness of the tonic against the juniper and other flavors in the gin. “But always the juniper on top,” he adds.
As for the rest, choose a tall, slim, chilled highball glass, the freshest limes possible and — no matter how hot the day — solid cubes of the coldest ice you can get. Ratios for tonic to gin vary widely, from equal parts to 2:1. It’s really a matter of taste.
Variations abound, and none are beyond the pale: a sprig of mint, or a dash of Angostura bitters only add additional layers of flavor. But the humble gin and tonic is a hot-weather drink, best not to be overthought.
“Keep it simple,” Gertsen says. “A gentle stir and a big ol’ hunk of lime and head for the hammock.”

The Perfect is a new occasional series featuring advice from experts on how to prepare your favorite food and drinks.  If you have an idea for an upcoming topic, let us know. Don't be fooled: the gin and tonic may be many things, but easy it is not. “It’s a very simple drink, as is the martini,” says London mixologist Jamie Walker, the global brand ambassador for Bombay Sapphire gin. “For that reason, it’s very easy to get wrong.” Because there’s so little that goes into this iconic drink — gin, tonic water, ice and perhaps a bit of lime — what really matters are good ingredients. For this particular cocktail, we have the British to thank, namely, Brits in 19th-century India, who were searching for ways to get their loyal subjects to ingest quinine, which is used to treat malaria and has at times been thought to repel mosquitos, which carry the disease. The amount of quinine in modern tonic water is a fraction of what’s needed for treatment (you’d need about 7 quarts of tonic water to even come close), but the drink’s popularity was established. More Entertainment stories Pitt says he learned lesson from Aniston fallout Disgraced pastor Ted Haggard to do 'Wife Swap' '16 and Pregnant' pair lose child over dirty house R.E.M. announces they're calling it quits 'Lost' actor, teen bride score reality show Yet even gin and tonic lovers face an uphill battle to find a good one.  Even when done right, it’s not an easy drink to love — tonic’s slightly bitter quinine taste is a turnoff to sweet-drink lovers. Atop the list of potential pitfalls is the tonic, a misunderstood beverage if ever there was one, and a potentially devastating blow to a perfect G&T. “The sad part is, it’s screwed up at 90 percent of the bars in America, and you know the reason?” asks Dale DeGroff, one of the nation’s leading mixology consultants and author of “The Craft of the Cocktail.” “Ninety percent of bars in America use soda out of a gun that in no way, shape or form resembles quinine water.” The better bet is tonic from a bottle — preferably one of those single-serving jobs, which preserves freshness. Request it that way if you’re ordering in a bar; the best bars will at least stock club soda and tonic in bottles. Brands are a matter of preference, though DeGroff is partial to Schweppes. (Me too, and I spent the better part of my childhood becoming a tonic water connoisseur — without gin.) Gin vs. gin The secret to the gin is the choice of botanicals. All gins have juniper as a flavor base in their distillation, which is what provides those foresty scents. But most use additional flavorings of citrus and spices. Bombay Sapphire has made its reputation on its use of 10 botanicals, from lemon peel to cubeb berries, a Javanese pepper. The mix makes Sapphire’s taste profile spicier than most — though Walker insists it’s the balance of flavors, not the number of them, that is key to its appeal. DeGroff prefers a more straightforward gin — any London dry such as Beefeater or regular Bombay — to the more aromatic options, which also include Dutch and Plymouth gins, and new options like Tanqueray Ten. John Gertsen, principal bartender at Boston’s No. 9 Park, opts for “something snappy” like the original Tanqueray. The key to the drink’s classic taste, DeGroff says, is to balance the bitterness of the tonic against the juniper and other flavors in the gin. “But always the juniper on top,” he adds. As for the rest, choose a tall, slim, chilled highball glass, the freshest limes possible and — no matter how hot the day — solid cubes of the coldest ice you can get. Ratios for tonic to gin vary widely, from equal parts to 2:1. It’s really a matter of taste. Variations abound, and none are beyond the pale: a sprig of mint, or a dash of Angostura bitters only add additional layers of flavor.  But the humble gin and tonic is a hot-weather drink, best not to be overthought. “Keep it simple,” Gertsen says. “A gentle stir and a big ol' hunk of lime and head for the hammock.”

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